We the People, Not We the Corporations

On January 21, 2010, with its ruling in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, the Supreme Court ruled that corporations are persons, entitled by the U.S. Constitution to buy elections and run our government. Human beings are people; corporations are legal fictions.

We, the People of the United States of America, reject the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in Citizens United and other related cases, and move to amend our Constitution to firmly establish that money is not speech, and that human beings, not corporations, are persons entitled to constitutional rights.

The Supreme Court is misguided in principle, and wrong on the law. In a democracy, the people rule.

We Move to Amend.

". . . corporations have no consciences, no beliefs, no feelings, no thoughts, no desires. Corporations help structure and facilitate the activities of human beings, to be sure, and their 'personhood' often serves as a useful legal fiction. But they are not themselves members of “We the People” by whom and for whom our Constitution was established."

             ~Supreme Court Justice Stevens, January 2010

Announcements

October 2017 Newsletter: Updates from the Movement to Amend

October 10, 2017

We now have 51 cosponsors for the We People Amendment in the House in 2017 -- which means we're well ahead of NEXT year's goal of 45 House cosponsors! We could never have done this without the marvelous work of our stupendous supporters and volunteers—folks like you, calling and writing your federal representatives to join this movement! THANK YOU!!

How America’s Biggest Bank Paid Its Fine for the 2008 Mortgage Crisis—With Phony Mortgages!

October 5, 2017

You know the old joke: How do you make a killing on Wall Street and never risk a loss? Easy—use other people’s money. Jamie Dimon and his underlings at JPMorgan Chase have perfected this dark art at America’s largest bank, which boasts a balance sheet one-eighth the size of the entire US economy.

Gun Stocks are Soaring After the Deadliest Mass Shooting in Modern US History

October 2, 2017

At least 59 people were killed and 527 were injured in the shooting Sunday night in Las Vegas. A gunman identified as Stephen Paddock opened fire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, aiming into a tightly packed crowd of thousands of people who were watching a country music festival, the police said.

American Outdoor Brands (formerly Smith & Wesson) and Sturm, Ruger & Co. rallied by more than 4%.